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just another found lamb that was lost





found lamb
found lamb:

Sheep and Lambs

All in the April evening,
April airs were abroad;
The sheep with their little lambs
Passed me by on the road.

The sheep with their little lambs
Passed me by on the road;
All in the April evening
I thought on the Lamb of God.

The lambs were weary and crying
With a weak, human cry.
I thought on the Lamb of God
Going meekly to die.

Up in the blue, blue mountains
Dewy pastures are sweet;
Rest for the little bodies,
Rest for the little feet.

But for the Lamb of God,
Up on the hill-top green,
Only a Cross of shame
Two stark crosses between.

All in the April evening,
April airs were abroad;
I saw the sheep with their lambs,
And thought on the Lamb of God.

Katharine Tynan
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IM GOLDY
IM GOLDY: nice
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tina_time7
tina_time7: I like lambs, such a little wee precious thing
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tina_time7
tina_time7: Lamb is a baby sheep I think by the way. I can also ask uncle Google.
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found lamb
found lamb:

From The Messiah: A Sacred Eclogue

Lo! earth receives him from the bending skies!
Sink down ye mountains, and ye vallies rise!
With heads declined ye cedars homage pay!
Be smooth ye rocks, ye rapid floods give way!
The Saviour comes! by ancient bards foretold:
Hear him ye deaf, and all ye blind, behold!
He from thick films shall purge the visual ray,
And on the sightless eye-ball pour the day.
'Tis he the obstructed paths of sound shall clear,
The dumb shall sing, the lame his crutch forego,
And leap exulting like the bounding roe:
No sigh, no murmer the wide world shall hear;
From every face he wipes off every tear.
In adamantine chains shall death be bound,
And hell's grim tyrant feel the eternal wound.
As the good shepherd tends his fleecy care,
Seeks freshest pastures and the purest air:
Explores the lost, the wandering sheep directs,
By day o'ersees them, and by night protects;
The tender lambs he raises in his arms,
Feeds from his hand, and in his bosom warms!
Thus shall mankind his guardian care engage,
The promis'd father of the future age.

Alexander Pope
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found lamb
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BigAlNH
BigAlNH: And He provides a Perfect example for us to follow.
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found lamb
found lamb:

St. Therese of Lisieux

Patron: of the Missions
Birth: 1873
Death: 1897

Generations of Catholics have admired this young saint, called her the "Little Flower", and found in her short life more inspiration for their own lives than in volumes by theologians.

Yet Therese died when she was 24, after having lived as cloistered Carmelite for less than ten years. She never went on missions, never founded a religious order, never performed great works. The only book of hers, published after her death, was an brief edited version of her journal called "Story of a Soul." (Collections of her letters and restored versions of her journals have been published recently.) But within 28 years of her death, the public demand was so great that she was canonized.

Over the years, some modern Catholics have turned away from her because they associate her with over- sentimentalized piety and yet the message she has for us is still as compelling and simple as it was almost a century ago.

Therese was born in France in 1873, the pampered daughter of a mother who had wanted to be a saint and a father who had wanted to be monk. The two had gotten married but determined they would be celibate until a priest told them that was not how God wanted a marriage to work! They must have followed his advice very well because they had nine children. The five children who lived were all daughters who were close all their lives.

Tragedy and loss came quickly to Therese when her mother died of breast cancer when she was four and a half years old. Her sixteen year old sister Pauline became her second mother -- which made the second loss even worse when Pauline entered the Carmelite convent five years later. A few months later, Therese became so ill with a fever that people thought she was dying.

The worst part of it for Therese was all the people sitting around her bed staring at her like, she said, "a string of onions." When Therese saw her sisters praying to statue of Mary in her room, Therese also prayed. She saw Mary smile at her and suddenly she was cured. She tried to keep the grace of the cure secret but people found out and badgered her with questions about what Mary was wearing, what she looked like. When she refused to give in to their curiosity, they passed the story that she had made the whole thing up.

Without realizing it, by the time she was eleven years old she had developed the habit of mental prayer. She would find a place between her bed and the wall and in that solitude think about God, life, eternity.

When her other sisters, Marie and Leonie, left to join religious orders (the Carmelites and Poor Clares, respectively), Therese was left alone with her last sister Celine and her father. Therese tells us that she wanted to be good but that she had an odd way of going about. This spoiled little Queen of her father's wouldn't do housework. She thought if she made the beds she was doing a great favor!

Every time Therese even imagined that someone was criticizing her or didn't appreciate her, she burst into tears. Then she would cry because she had cried! Any inner wall she built to contain her wild emotions crumpled immediately before the tiniest comment.

Therese wanted to enter the Carmelite convent to join Pauline and Marie but how could she convince others that she could handle the rigors of Carmelite life, if she couldn't handle her own emotional outbursts? She had prayed that Jesus would help her but there was no sign of an answer.

On Christmas day in 1886, the fourteen-year-old hurried home from church. In France, young children left their shoes by the hearth at Christmas, and then parents would fill them with gifts. By fourteen, most children outgrew this custom. But her sister Celine didn't want Therese to grow up. So they continued to leave presents in "baby" Therese's shoes.

As she and Celine climbed the stairs to take off their hats, their father's voice rose up from the parlor below. Standing over the shoes, he sighed, "Thank goodness that's the last time we shall have this kind of thing!"

Therese froze, and her sister looked at her helplessly. Celine knew that in a few minutes Therese would be in tears over what her father had said.

But the tantrum never came. Something incredible had happened to Therese. Jesus had come into her heart and done what she could not do herself. He had made her more sensitive to her father's feelings than her own.

She swallowed her tears, walked slowly down the stairs, and exclaimed over the gifts in the shoes, as if she had never heard a word her father said. The following year she entered the convent. In her autobiography she referred to this Christmas as her "conversion."

Therese be known as the Little Flower but she had a will of steel. When the superior of the Carmelite convent refused to take Therese because she was so young, the formerly shy little girl went to the bishop. When the bishop also said no, she decided to go over his head, as well.

Her father and sister took her on a pilgrimage to Rome to try to get her mind off this crazy idea. Therese loved it. It was the one time when being little worked to her advantage! Because she was young and small she could run everywhere, touch relics and tombs without being yelled at. Finally they went for an audience with the Pope. They had been forbidden to speak to him but that didn't stop Therese. As soon as she got near him, she begged that he let her enter the Carmelite convent. She had to be carried out by two of the guards!

But the Vicar General who had seen her courage was impressed and soon Therese was admitted to the Carmelite convent that her sisters Pauline and Marie had already joined. Her romantic ideas of convent life and suffering soon met up with reality in a way she had never expected. Her father suffered a series of strokes that left him affected not only physically but mentally. When he began hallucinating and grabbed for a gun as if going into battle, he was taken to an asylum for the insane. Horrified, Therese learned of the humiliation of the father she adored and admired and of the gossip and pity of their so-called friends. As a cloistered nun she couldn't even visit her father.

This began a horrible time of suffering when she experienced such dryness in prayer that she stated "Jesus isn't doing much to keep the conversation going." She was so grief-stricken that she often fell asleep in prayer. She consoled herself by saying that mothers loved children when they lie asleep in their arms so that God must love her when she slept during prayer.

She knew as a Carmelite nun she would never be able to perform great deeds. " Love proves itself by deeds, so how am I to show my love? Great deeds are forbidden me. The only way I can prove my love is by scattering flowers and these flowers are every little sacrifice, every glance and word, and the doing of the least actions for love." She took every chance to sacrifice, no matter how small it would seem. She smiled at the sisters she didn't like. She ate everything she was given without complaining -- so that she was often given the worst leftovers. One time she was accused of breaking a vase when she was not at fault. Instead of arguing she sank to her knees and begged forgiveness. These little sacrifices cost her more than bigger ones, for these went unrecognized by others. No one told her how wonderful she was for these little secret humiliations and good deeds.

When Pauline was elected prioress, she asked Therese for the ultimate sacrifice. Because of politics in the convent, many of the sisters feared that the family Martin would taken over the convent. Therefore Pauline asked Therese to remain a novice, in order to allay the fears of the others that the three sisters would push everyone else around. This meant she would never be a fully professed nun, that she would always have to ask permission for everything she did. This sacrifice was made a little sweeter when Celine entered the convent after her father's death. Four of the sisters were now together again.

Therese continued to worry about how she could achieve holiness in the life she led. She didn't want to just be good, she wanted to be a saint. She thought there must be a way for people living hidden, little lives like hers. " I have always wanted to become a saint. Unfortunately when I have compared myself with the saints, I have always found that there is the same difference between the saints and me as there is between a mountain whose summit is lost in the clouds and a humble grain of sand trodden underfoot by passers-by. Instead of being discouraged, I told myself: God would not make me wish for something impossible and so, in spite of my littleness, I can aim at being a saint. It is impossible for me to grow bigger, so I put up with myself as I am, with all my countless faults. But I will look for some means of going to heaven by a little way which is very short and very straight, a little way that is quite new.

" We live in an age of inventions. We need no longer climb laboriously up flights of stairs; in well-to-do houses there are lifts. And I was determined to find a lift to carry me to Jesus, for I was far too small to climb the steep stairs of perfection. So I sought in holy Scripture some idea of what this life I wanted would be, and I read these words: "Whosoever is a little one, come to me." It is your arms, Jesus, that are the lift to carry me to heaven. And so there is no need for me to grow up: I must stay little and become less and less."

She worried about her vocation: " I feel in me the vocation of the Priest. I have the vocation of the Apostle. Martyrdom was the dream of my youth and this dream has grown with me. Considering the mystical body of the Church, I desired to see myself in them all. Charity gave me the key to my vocation. I understood that the Church had a Heart and that this Heart was burning with love. I understood that Love comprised all vocations, that Love was everything, that it embraced all times and places...in a word, that it was eternal! Then in the excess of my delirious joy, I cried out: O Jesus, my Love...my vocation, at last I have found it...My vocation is Love!"

When an antagonist was elected prioress, new political suspicions and plottings sprang up. The concern over the Martin sisters perhaps was not exaggerated. In this small convent they now made up one-fifth of the population. Despite this and the fact that Therese was a permanent novice they put her in charge of the other novices.

Then in 1896, she coughed up blood. She kept working without telling anyone until she became so sick a year later everyone knew it. Worst of all she had lost her joy and confidence and felt she would die young without leaving anything behind. Pauline had already had her writing down her memories for journal and now she wanted her to continue -- so they would have something to circulate on her life after her death.

Her pain was so great that she said that if she had not had faith she would have taken her own life without hesitation. But she tried to remain smiling and cheerful -- and succeeded so well that some thought she was only pretending to be ill. Her one dream as the work she would do after her death, helping those on earth. "Upon my death I will let fall a shower of roses; I wish to spend my heaven in doing good upon the earth." She died on September 30, 1897 at the age of 24 years old. She herself felt it was a blessing God allowed her to die at exactly that age. she had always felt that she had a vocation to be a priest and felt God let her die at the age she would have been ordained if she had been a man so that she wouldn't have to suffer.

After she died, everything at the convent went back to normal. One nun commented that there was nothing to say about Therese. But Pauline put together Therese's writings (and heavily edited them, unfortunately) and sent 2000 copies to other convents. But Therese's "little way" of trusting in Jesus to make her holy and relying on small daily sacrifices instead of great deeds appealed to the thousands of Catholics and others who were trying to find holiness in ordinary lives. Within two years, the Martin family had to move because her notoriety was so great and by 1925 she had been canonized.

Therese of Lisieux is one of the patron saints of the missions, not because she ever went anywhere, but because of her special love of the missions, and the prayers and letters she gave in support of missionaries. This is reminder to all of us who feel we can do nothing, that it is the little things that keep God's kingdom growing.
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found lamb:

PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK

Joan Lindsay’s 1967 Picnic at Hanging Rock is a work of fiction set in Victoria, Australia, in 1900. The novel recounts the tale of three schoolgirls and a teacher who go missing after wandering onto the dangerous Hanging Rock formation. Only one of them is recovered a week later; the rest are never heard from again, despite careful searches of the area. The trauma and horror of this incident spreads, leading to the suicide of two other characters. Lindsay’s novel can be considered a piece of Gothic fiction. It might be further classified as Female Gothic for its critique of the strict rules that dictate the lives of the female characters, who escape society for the freedom and horror of the wilderness.

The students at Appleyard College, a prestigious boarding school for teenage girls outside the town of Macedon, are excited to be going on a picnic on Valentine’s Day. They are accompanied by two of their teachers, their French and dance teacher, Mademoiselle de Poitiers, and their mathematics teacher, Miss McCraw. As the headmistress, Mrs. Appleyard, bids them farewell, she instructs them to keep their gloves on when they ride through town. The girls are driven to the picnic ground by Mr. Hussey on his horse-drawn buggy.

The picnic ground is eerily quiet. Mr. Hussey and Miss McCraw notice that their watches have stopped working. Seniors Marion, Miranda, and Irma ask if they can walk to the base of Hanging Rock, which looms beyond the trees. They are allowed to do so, but instructed not to take too long, as they need to leave the picnic ground at four o’clock. The unpopular Edith asks if she can tag along, and kind-hearted Miranda consents.

The girls follow the creek toward Hanging Rock, passing another group of picnickers as they do. Michael “Mike” Fitzhubert, a young aristocratic English man, and Albert Crundall, the family’s coachman, watch the girls pass. Mike notices the grace and beauty of Miranda, while Albert pays particular attention to Irma. Mike and Albert discuss the girls’ progress and talk about their respective upbringings.

Initially, the girls are attentive to the time; Miranda reminds the group that they will have to turn around shortly. However, as they ascend Hanging Rock, the senior girls start to behave erratically. They take off their shoes and stockings despite the rough surface of the rock, Marion throws her notebook and pencil into a bush, and Irma starts to dance, imagining that she is a ballerina. All four girls fall into a deep sleep. When they wake up, the three senior girls continue to walk up Hanging Rock, despite Edith’s pleas that they turn back. It is now twilight. They hear a distant beating sound, but disregard it. The sound is Mr. Hussey beating on a billy (a kettle) to attract the lost girls’ attention. Edith screams, but no one hears. She runs back to the picnic ground.

Mr. Hussey retraces the girls’ steps according to Edith but cannot find them. Meanwhile Mike and Albert’s party has departed with no idea that anything is amiss. Back at the picnic ground, the group realizes that Miss McCraw is also missing; her gloves and books are where she left them. Eventually, the group decides to return to the college despite the fact that Marion, Miranda, Irma, and Miss McCraw are still not accounted for. Mr. Hussey stops at the police station on the way back and provides a full account of the mystery.

The next day, some of the girls are attended to by a doctor; no one is hurt. Police interview Edith and Mademoiselle de Poitiers as they begin searching Hanging Rock and the surrounding area. There is no evidence of the missing persons. The police detective, Constable Bumpher, brings Edith back to the site, and she recalls seeing Miss McCraw striding up Hanging Rock without her skirt on. Mrs. Appleyard tries to manage the tide of gossip and to alert the families of the missing girls and teacher without attracting controversy or attention to the college.

A week later, Mike escapes from a party of local well-to-do families to share a beer with Albert in the boatshed; the two have become close friends. Mike confides that he can’t stop thinking about the Hanging Rock mystery. He convinces Albert to accompany him to Hanging Rock the next day, although they pretend that they are just going for a ride. They reach Hanging Rock and begin to search. Mike loses track of time and is hours late to his rendezvous with Albert. Mike insists on staying the night there; he has marked the last place he reached in his search. Albert is worried about him but concedes, returning to Lake View (the Fitzhuberts’ estate). The next morning he tells Mike’s uncle, Colonel Fitzhubert, that Mike spent the night in a pub. After a fitful sleep, Mike searches again the next morning. At one point, he falls into a deep sleep. He awakes with a gash on his head and hears the sound of girlish laughter, which he believes is coming from Miranda. He pursues her over strange and dangerous rock formations. Meanwhile, Albert is beginning to worry about Mike, and rides back to Hanging Rock. He arrives in the early afternoon and finds Mike unconscious on the ground beneath the rock. Albert runs to find a doctor; they transport Mike back to Lake View. Albert checks Mike’s pocket and finds that he has left a confusing, half-finished note about having found someone. Albert alerts the police and they go to the place indicated by Mike’s note, where they find Irma, exhausted and unconscious but alive. Irma recuperates at the gardener’s cottage at Lake View. When she finally regains consciousness, she cannot remember any of the events of Hanging Rock. Mike, too, cannot properly remember what happened, although he is haunted by the idea of Miranda. A romance seems to be developing between Irma and Mike, but Mike abruptly leaves for Melbourne.

Meanwhile, Mrs. Appleyard continues trying to quash rumors about the college and to maintain a sense of decorum and normality. The girls are forced back into a regimented routine of lessons and rules. Sara Waybourne, the youngest boarder at the school, struggles especially; Miranda was her roommate and her closest friend. She is treated cruelly by her teachers, especially Mrs. Appleyard, who cancels Sara’s art lessons when her guardian’s school fees are late and dismisses the art teacher, Mrs. Vallange. Before she leaves, Mrs. Vallange leaves a note for Sara, inviting her to stay with her in Melbourne whenever she would like to. Irish Tom, the college handyman, forgets to give Mrs. Vallange’s note to Sara.

Irma visits the college before she is due to travel to Europe with her parents. She expects a warm welcome, but the girls crowd her savagely, acting like animals. After Irma leaves, the girls seem to have no memory of their behavior.

Mike briefly returns to Macedon to retrieve a letter he left at Lake View. He tells Albert that he is still haunted by Hanging Rock; he believes that he will never forget it. He invites Albert to accompany him on a trip to Queensland, but Albert doesn’t want to leave the stability of his position at Lake View. The next morning, as Albert is driving Mike back to the station to return to Melbourne, Albert receives a letter from Irma Leopold’s father, thanking him for saving his daughter’s life. A check for 1,000 pounds is included. Albert replies, thanking Mr. Leopold sincerely, then gives his notice to Colonel Fitzhubert and writes to Mike to tell him that he will come to Queensland.

At the college, Mrs. Appleyard tries to hide the fact that Sara is missing. She tells some staff members that her guardian has already collected her, while telling others that her guardian will be coming shortly. Madame de Poitiers is suspicious, and writes to Constable Bumpher about her fear that Sara is missing. Meanwhile, Mrs. Appleyard sneaks into Sara’s room looking for clues but finds none. Sara’s guardian writes to say that he will be arriving to collect her that weekend.

Mr. Whitehead, the gardener, finds Sara’s body; she has killed herself by jumping off the college’s high tower. Mr. Whitehead tells Mrs. Appleyard, who lets out an animalistic scream. She goes to town, where she instructs Mr. Hussey to drive her to Hanging Rock. She walks up Hanging Rock alone and throws herself from a precipice, killing herself.

In a newspaper article written 13 years later, the mystery of the missing persons has still not been solved. It is revealed that Appleyard College burned down in 1901.
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found lamb
found lamb in reply to IM GOLDY: - I haven't seen that version yet. I've seen the 1975 Peter Weir version many times - and it haunts me -
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tularcitas
tularcitas: Wow!
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MortSahlFan
MortSahlFan: I saw this movie once, and it reminded me of "Black Narcissus" but I did record it and might give it another chance.. It's Brando month on TCM also
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found lamb
found lamb:

Our Lady of Fátima

Also known as: Lady of the Rosary

Our Lady of Fátima, in Roman Catholicism, the Virgin Mary in her six appearances before three peasant children near the village of Fátima, Portugal, in 1917. Since that revelation, millions of the faithful have made pilgrimages to the site where the woman, commonly called Our Lady of Fátima, appeared. The Roman Catholic Church officially recognized the Fátima events as worthy of belief in 1930.

On May 13, 1917, Lucia dos Santos (aged 9) and her cousins Francisco and Jacinta Marto (aged 8 and 6, respectively) were tending sheep in central Portugal, about 113 km (70 miles) northeast of Lisbon, when they had a vision of a woman surrounded by light who identified herself as the Lady of the Rosary. Following the initial event, the children reported seeing the vision five more times, once each month through October. During her appearances, Our Lady of Fátima supposedly gave the children three secrets and repeatedly exhorted them to pray the rosary for world peace and emphasized the necessity of devotions to her Immaculate Heart in order for souls to be saved. The children also said that she told them God would perform a miracle on October 13 so that people would believe. A crowd estimated at about 70,000 gathered at Fátima on that day and witnessed what has been described as a miraculous solar phenomenon in which the Sun appeared to fall toward Earth—sometimes called the Miracle of the Sun—immediately after the lady’s final appearance to the children.

After initially questioning the authenticity of the children’s visions, the Vatican accepted them as appearances of the Virgin Mary (Our Lady of the Holy Rosary of Fátima), and Fátima became the location of one of the greatest Marian shrines in the world, visited by thousands of pilgrims each year. The first national pilgrimage to Fátima took place in 1927, and a basilica was begun in 1928 and consecrated in 1953. With a tower 65 metres (213 feet) high and surmounted by a large bronze crown and a crystal cross, the basilica is flanked by hospitals and retreat houses and faces a vast square in which the little Chapel of the Apparitions is located. Numerous cures of the sick have been reported. On May 13, 1967—the 50th anniversary of the first vision—a crowd of about a million pilgrims gathered at Fátima to hear Pope Paul VI say mass and pray for peace.

At the end of the 20th century, there was growing speculation concerning the three secrets Our Lady of Fátima allegedly revealed to the children in 1917. Though two of the messages had been disclosed in the 1940s—commonly interpreted as the prediction of the end of World War I and the start of World War II and the rise and fall of communism—the third had been kept secret by the Vatican, giving rise to numerous theories. In May 2000 it was finally announced that the third message was the Virgin Mary’s vision of the May 13, 1981, assassination attempt on Pope John Paul II, .and the pope publicly credited Our Lady of Fátima for saving his life.

Although Lucia dos Santos would later become a Carmelite nun and live to the age of 97, Francisco and Jacinta Marto died as children as a result of the influenza pandemic of 1918–19. The pious siblings were beatified in 2000 by Pope John Paul II, making them the youngest non-martyred children to be beatified in the history of the Roman Catholic Church. They were canonized as saints by Pope Francis in 2017 to coincide with the 100th anniversary of their visions.
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badmouth
badmouth: A) As Mary had predicted, Jacinta and Francisco died during the Spanish flu epidemic. Francisco died in April 1919 and Jacinta, in February

B) Are the children of Fatima incorrupt?
The cause for the siblings' canonization began in 1946. Exhumed in 1935, Jacinta's face was found to be incorrupt; Francisco's had decomposed.
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found lamb:

MARY MAGDALENE

At the beginning of the eighth chapter of his Gospel, Luke describes the followers who accompanied Jesus as he travelled and preached:

The twelve were with him, and certain women, which had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities, Mary called Magdalene, out of whom went seven devils,and many others which ministered unto him of their substance.

Elsewhere in the gospels, Mary Magdalene is named as a witness to the Crucifixion (Matthew, 27, 56) and the Resurrection (Matthew, 28, 1–10).

From an early time she was also identified with other women in the New Testament: the 'sinner' who anoints Christ's feet in the house of the Pharisee (Luke, 7, 36–50); with Mary of Bethany, the sister of Martha (Luke, 10, 38–42), and sister of Lazarus, the dead man revived by Christ (John, 11, 1–44); and with the woman taken in adultery, whom Jesus saves from the stones of a hypocritical mob (John, 8, 1–11).

Popular interest in Mary grew in the eleventh century, but her story is told most fully in The Golden Legend, the thirteenth–century collection of saints' lives written by the Italian Dominican monk Jacobus de Voragine. He gives us a detailed description of her background and early character:

Mary Magdalene is so called because of her connection with the town of Magdalum. She was born of noble parents who indeed were of royal descent. Together with her brother Lazarus and sister Martha she owned Magdalum, a fortified town two miles from Genezareth, Bethany, near Jerusalem, and a large part of Jerusalem itself. Since Mary Magdalene was enormously wealthy, and pleasure is the boon companion of affluence, she was as notorious for her abandonment to fleshly pleasures as she was celebrated for her beauty and riches.

She meets Jesus, who 'set her all on fire with love for him, made her one of his closest associates, and lovingly defended her on many occasions'. After Christ's Ascension, she travels to France with her sister Martha and brother Lazarus, where she eventually retires to a life of solitude:

In the meantime blessed Mary Magdalene, wishing to devote herself to heavenly contemplation, withdrew to a barren wilderness where she remained in anonymity for thirty years in a place prepared for her by the hands of angels. In this wilderness there was no water, and there were no trees or grass, nor any comforts of any kind, so that it was clear that our Redeemer had meant to feed her not with earthly foods but with the sweets of Heaven alone. Each day at the seven canonical hours she was lifted in the air by angels and actually heard, with her bodily organs of hearing, the glorious harmonies of the celestial chorus. So, filled day by day with this exquisite heavenly fare, when she was bought back to her cave, she had not the slightest need for bodily nourishment.

The site of her hermitage, Ste-Baume in Provence, and Vézelay, where her relics were brought in the eleventh century, became popular sites of pilgrimage. They remained so, even after 1641 when a scholar in Paris published a treatise entitled Dissertation on the False Arrival in Provence of Lazarus, Maximinus, Magdalene and Martha.

In the seventeenth century, the theme of Mary, wide-eyed and weeping in her grotto, was a popular subject in poetry as well as art. Mary's name, written as 'maudlin', entered the English language as a synonym for 'tearful', eventually coming to describe 'that stage of drunkenness which is characterised by the shedding of tears and effusive displays of affection'.
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found lamb
found lamb: Marian Anderson - Ave Maria - Lincoln Memorial - 1939

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zimmythegeek
zimmythegeek: Marian Anderson was born a few blocks down from where I lived for 30 years. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marian_Anderson_House
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found lamb: Caterina Valente - My Funny Valentine

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Marion Anderson and the DAR

In addition to its striking neoclassical design by architect John Russell Pope, Constitution Hall is noted for an important event that never occurred there. In 1939, Constitution Hall was at the center of a Civil Rights crisis when the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), an all-white organization of descendants of Revolutionary War soldiers, denied famous African-American opera singer Marian Anderson use of its concert hall.

At that time, Constitution Hall was the only local venue large enough to accommodate Anderson’s typical audience, but the venue banned black performers. The organization would not make an exception for Anderson and claimed the hall was already booked. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and Anderson’s manager, Sol Hurok, arranged for her to sing instead on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. Secretary of the Interior Harold Ickes helped organize the Easter Sunday event on April 9, 1939. Accompanied by a piano, Anderson first serenaded an integrated crowd of 75,000 people with the patriotic ballad, “My Country, ‘Tis of Thee.” The entire concert lasted 25 minutes.

Although Anderson and the DAR maintained the incident was merely a misunderstanding, the singer’s outdoor concert became a symbol for Civil Rights activism nation-wide. In support of Anderson and equal rights, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt resigned her membership in the DAR. In 1943, making an exception to its racial ban, which did not end until 1952, the DAR invited Anderson to perform at Constitution Hall for a war-benefit concert. Anderson agreed under the condition that the audience be integrated. Around half of the sold-out audience was black. Eleanor Roosevelt, two Supreme Court justices, and other prominent politicians also attended. For her last song Anderson sang “The Star Spangled Banner,” a powerful reminder of American perseverance through hardship.

Anderson’s concert in front of the iconic Lincoln statue has become part of the popular consciousness of race relations in the United States. Contrary to its aims, the DAR unwittingly gave voice and publicity to the Civil Rights struggle. In recent years the organization has apologized for its past segregationist policies. It has pursued various methods of righting the wrong including calling attention to this important chapter in Civil Rights history by amending the National Historic Landmark nomination for Constitution Hall to document the significance of Marian Anderson’s exclusion. Constitution Hall stands as a reminder of a major shift in the Civil Rights movement when one woman sang against adversity.
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found lamb: Marion Anderson at the Lincoln Memorial
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found lamb: Bouguereau

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found lamb: El Vito

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found lamb: Handel - Watermusic

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found lamb
found lamb: Pachelbel

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found lamb
found lamb: Canon & Gigue in D Major
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found lamb
found lamb: Anita O'Day - Newport Jazz Festival - 1958

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found lamb
found lamb: Sweet Georgia Brown
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found lamb
found lamb: Ana Vidovic plays Spanish guitar

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found lamb
found lamb: Asturias by Isaac Albeniz
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found lamb
found lamb: Loretta Lynn - Ten Thousand Angels

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found lamb
found lamb: Maria Callas - Madame Butterfly

3 months ago Report Link
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found lamb
found lamb: Sumina Studer - Mozart Violin Concerto No.3

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found lamb
found lamb: Sumina Studer - Violin Concerto No. 3

3 months ago Report
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found lamb
found lamb: Hilary Hahn - Bach Sarabande

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found lamb
found lamb: Jennifer Pike - The Lark Ascending

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found lamb
found lamb changed his profile picture: 3 months ago Report
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found lamb
found lamb:


THE BRIDE, THE LAMB'S WIFE

And I saw a new heaven and a new earth: for the first heaven and the first earth were passed away; and there was no more sea.

And I John saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down from God out of heaven, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband.

And I heard a great voice out of heaven saying, "Behold, the tabernacle of God is with men, and he will dwell with them, and they shall be his people, and God himself shall be with them, and be their God.

And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes; and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow, nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain: for the former things are passed away."

And he that sat upon the throne said, "Behold, I make all things new. And he said unto me, Write: for these words are true and faithful."

And he said unto me, "It is done. I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give unto him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely.

He that overcometh shall inherit all things; and I will be his God, and he shall be my son.

But the fearful, and unbelieving, and the abominable, and murderers, and whoremongers, and sorcerers, and idolaters, and all liars, shall have their part in the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone: which is the second death."

And there came unto me one of the seven angels which had the seven vials full of the seven last plagues, and talked with me, saying, "Come hither, I will shew thee the bride, the Lamb's wife."

Revelation 21:1-9
King James Bible
3 months ago Report
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BigAlNH
BigAlNH: Nice pic found, and just the right size piece of Revelations to go with it.
3 months ago Report
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found lamb
found lamb:


THE MARRIAGE OF THE LAMB

And I heard as it were the voice of a great multitude, and as the voice of many waters, and as the voice of mighty thunderings, saying, "Alleluia: for the Lord God omnipotent reigneth.

Let us be glad and rejoice, and give honour to him: for the marriage of the Lamb is come, and his wife hath made herself ready.

And to her was granted that she should be arrayed in fine linen, clean and white: for the fine linen is the righteousness of saints."

And he saith unto me, "Write, Blessed are they which are called unto the marriage supper of the Lamb." And he saith unto me, "These are the true sayings of God."

Revelation 19:6-9
King James Bible
3 months ago Report
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found lamb
found lamb: Lila Downs - La Llarona

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Tesita
Tesita: I would venture to say on my top 5 list.
3 months ago Report
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BigAlNH
BigAlNH: I love music, almost every genre, from punk rock to classical. But this woman's voice and the way she uses it to express her emotions ... made me listen to it over and over, even though I have no clue what she's saying.
3 months ago Report
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found lamb
found lamb: Joan Baez - La Llarona

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Tesita
Tesita: An awesome version...
3 months ago Report
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BigAlNH
BigAlNH: I only knew Joan Baez as an American folk singer, but this is really sweet. What a great voice!
3 months ago Report
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found lamb
found lamb: Chavela Vargas - La Llarona

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2
Tesita
Tesita: BY far my favorite rendition of these Hispanic women.
3 months ago Report
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