Why is the climate changing. (Page 134)

kittybobo34
kittybobo34: I didn't know that Sir Loin. One would think those salt water crocs would have found you over there...
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zeffur
zeffur: Someone needs to transport a few crocodiles to NZ for fun in the sun... lol jk
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zeffur
zeffur: Interesting:



src: https://www.sciencealert.com/nasa-is-tracking-the-mysterious-evolving-anomaly-in-earth-s-magnetic-field
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kittybobo34
kittybobo34: Possibly enough plutonium or other fissionable material are exploding near the outer core to disrupt the magnetic fields.. I don't think Geologists have focused on what is going on down there or come up with diagnostic tools to really tell.
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zeffur
zeffur: I was thinking it may have something to do with the pole shifting that has begun...
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kittybobo34
kittybobo34: It surely does have something to do with it. It seems to be a regular thing. I am not sure off the top of my head as to the average time between shifts., but my thinking is that enough irradiated uranium will eventually become plutonium , and enough of that will detonate.. So it might be like Old Faithful, a cyclic phenomena
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ghostgeek
ghostgeek: I’ve always dismissed it. I’ve always gone out of my way to say “Pole Shift” is going to be a magnetic pole shift, not an actual movement of the physical poles.

Then on some long lost posting on WUWT Lief Svalgaard said that the liquid iron part of the Earth’s core had a viscosity less than that of water (one presumes at near normal room temperatures).

That has just nagged at me.

IFF the crust is solid on a very viscous mantle, and then there is a layer as liquid as water, what in the world would prevent the crust from “wandering around”? And I don’t mean just the plates drifting on top of the viscous layer of the mantle, I mean the whole thing.

It ought to have significant ‘tidal’ flexing and significant magnetic interactions of the liquid layer with the magnetosphere. We know the mag field has complete reversals at times. So what on earth prevents the crustal layer from ‘wandering around’ relative to the rest?

[ https://chiefio.wordpress.com/2011/01/22/can-the-earth-crust-slip/ ]
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kittybobo34
kittybobo34: ghost,, the iron part is the outer core, being boiled by the nulclear inner core,, the mantel above that is much more viscous, so the crust wanders but very slowly. I think the american continent is moving about an inch a year westward, the Pacific plate is about a half inch eastward with the boundary between them moving north. So california is heading up to Alaska.
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ghostgeek
ghostgeek: Technologies that can remove carbon dioxide from the air could have huge implications for future food prices, according to new research.

Scientists say that machines that remove CO2 from the air will be needed to keep the rise in global temperatures in check.

But these devices will have major impacts on energy, water and land use.

By 2050, according to this new report, food crop prices could rise more than five-fold in some parts of the world.

[ https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-53891414 ]
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ghostgeek
ghostgeek: One of the ideas on how to achieve this is called BECCS - bioenergy with carbon capture and storage. It means growing crops that soak up CO2, then burning them for electricity while capturing and burying the carbon that's produced.

Critics say this idea would need the deployment of huge amounts of land which would reduce the amount of land for agriculture at a time of increasing global population.

Another technology that has raised much interest is called Direct Air Capture (DAC), where machines pull CO2 directly from the atmosphere.

A number of experimental installations of this idea have been successfully implemented, notably in Switzerland and Canada.

But there has been little research to date on how the deployment of DAC would impact crop and food prices.

This new study looks at the large-scale deployment of a range of negative emissions technologies including DAC.

The report says that the energy and water resources needed to drive these machines will be on a very large scale.

DAC will need large amounts of heat to make the process work, say the authors. This would require energy equal to 115% of current global natural gas consumption.

[ https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-53891414 ]
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ghostgeek
ghostgeek: This sounds like my kind of climate change:

Some 56 million years ago, during the transition between the Paleocene and Eocene epochs, Earth caught a fever. In a span of scarcely 20,000 years—not even a rounding error in most measures of geologic time—massive amounts of carbon dioxide flowed into the atmosphere, and average temperatures rose by five to eight degrees Celsius. The planet was transformed. Crocodiles basked on Arctic beaches lined with palm trees, and steamy swamps and jungles stretched across much of the midlatitudes. Such “hyperthermal” events periodically come and go throughout Earth’s history, but this one was particularly intense for unclear reasons.

[ https://getpocket.com/explore/item/earth-s-orbital-shifts-may-have-triggered-ancient-global-warming?utm_source=pocket-newtab ]
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kittybobo34
kittybobo34: Ghost,, That one is a puzzle, my guess is that after the KT extinction left no animal life, the plants finally recovered but the animal life was lagging behind. So a world rich in oxygen. Once a fire gets started, especially near a coal seam from all that buried dead vegetation from the KT event it would have dumped billions of tons of co2 into the air..
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kittybobo34
kittybobo34: I think they called that the PETM Paleocene Eocene Thermal Max.
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ghostgeek
ghostgeek: Well, there seems to be another puzzle coming down the road and it's going to hit us pretty soon:

Solar panels are an increasingly important source of renewable power that will play an essential role in fighting climate change. They are also complex pieces of technology that become big, bulky sheets of electronic waste at the end of their lives—and right now, most of the world doesn’t have a plan for dealing with that.

But we’ll need to develop one soon, because the solar e-waste glut is coming. By 2050, the International Renewable Energy Agency projects that up to 78 million metric tons of solar panels will have reached the end of their life, and that the world will be generating about 6 million metric tons of new solar e-waste annually. While the latter number is a small fraction of the total e-waste humanity produces each year, standard electronics recycling methods don’t cut it for solar panels. Recovering the most valuable materials from one, including silver and silicon, requires bespoke recycling solutions. And if we fail to develop those solutions along with policies that support their widespread adoption, we already know what will happen.

[ https://www.wired.com/story/solar-panels-are-starting-to-die-leaving-behind-toxic-trash/?utm_source=pocket-newtab ]
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Sir Loin
Sir Loin: Zeff, I just had a thought which might help you eat fish. If it's heavy metals you're worried about, I precipitate them out of water samples using potassium cyanide. You might like to try it
You're welcome
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zeffur
zeffur: Sir Loin, I'l keep a safe distance & watch you prepare & eat your first batch?
Okay?
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zeffur
zeffur: Solar panels cells can be recycled:

https://www.cedgreentech.com/article/can-solar-panels-be-recycled
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Fractured fairy tale
Fractured fairy tale: So can Plastiqe But its rearly as a Rosey a Picture as the Hive Brain paints it
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kittybobo34
kittybobo34: I think recycling will have to be a public utility rather than a for profit system. Its something that is needed for the health and welfare of the whole society. That is not something that works in the capitalist model.
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zeffur
zeffur: Yeah, greed can't be bothered with extra expenses--let the taxpayers pay for that kind of thing.
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kittybobo34
kittybobo34: The objective would be to sort it all into its constituent parts, then sell what it can to recover expenses. Kind of like what your Kidneys do for your blood.
(Edited by kittybobo34)
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ghostgeek
ghostgeek: The Holocene temperature conundrum

A recent temperature reconstruction of global annual temperature shows Early Holocene warmth followed by a cooling trend through the Middle to Late Holocene [Marcott SA, et al., 2013, Science 339(6124):1198–1201]. This global cooling is puzzling because it is opposite from the expected and simulated global warming trend due to the retreating ice sheets and rising atmospheric greenhouse gases. ...

In the latest reconstruction of the global surface temperature throughout the Holocene (1) (hereafter M13), the most striking feature is a pronounced cooling trend of ∼0.5 °C following the Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM) (∼10–6 ka) toward the late Holocene, with the Neoglacial cooling culminating in the Little Ice Age (LIA; ∼1,800 common era) (Fig. 1, blue). Numerous previous reconstructions have shown cooling trends in the Holocene, but most of these studies attribute the cooling trend to regional and/or seasonal climate changes (2⇓⇓⇓–6). The distinct feature of the M13 reconstruction is that it arguably infers the cooling trend in the global mean and annual mean temperature. This inferred global annual cooling in the Holocene is puzzling: With no direct net contribution from the orbital insolation, the global annual mean radiative forcing in the Holocene should be dominated by the retreating ice sheets and rising atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs), with both favoring a globally averaged warming. Therefore, how can the global annual temperature exhibit a cooling trend in response to global warming forcing?

[ https://www.pnas.org/content/111/34/E3501 ]
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kittybobo34
kittybobo34: This was the beginning of the recurring pattern of ice ages and warm periods. I think perhaps the continental drift had reached the point allowing these cycles.
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ghostgeek
ghostgeek: Well, I wish it would stop and leave us all toasty warm.
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kittybobo34
kittybobo34: We may get more warm than we bargained for. The planet has only been that warm 2 times since life started. Both times most species went extinct.
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