Most atheists dont know about science

PokerMan
PokerMan: Why is this?
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CandyRivers
CandyRivers: Most people don't know about science - that's why.
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maxamilian
maxamilian: upon what research do you base that assertion on.
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CandyRivers
CandyRivers: on working with the general public.

Tell me if you asked 10 random people in the street to explain covalent bonding to you - do you think most of them could?
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PokerMan
PokerMan: i bet all ten couldnt tell you
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PokerMan
PokerMan: max,

the same research how I base why most christians dont know about the bible, science and God followers are both religions, they both claim to be looking for the truth, both are against each other, and are basically opposites at best, and not everyone who proclaims who they are, are what they say they are, just because they believe in something like science or religion doesnt make them automatically all of a sudden know what science is and what its about. Someone can believe in science for 1 year and still barely know anything about it 5 years down the road. Just the same goes to religious people. Its because people dont care what they believe in as long as its to their liking and fits them as a human being.
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Teece
Teece: Well said!
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Topsyturvy
Topsyturvy: True, however as stated above most religious people don't understand what they are worshiping. I believe the term Athiest is more of a description related to hightened awareness both personal and of one's surroundings. Therfore affirming the fact that they prefer to live life in FACT rather than fiction.
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Teece
Teece: Awesome - totally agree with that!!
I believe in myself, the sun, the moon, the tides and all things around me that are tangible and that affect my every day life.
It's a bit sad really that we feel we have to have an explaination for what we believe in......

But hey, its interesting fodder for the brain non the less.....
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CandyRivers
CandyRivers: i am an atheist, I dont think I have heightened awareness or anything, it is just religious belief just seems so silly.

And all the for the benefit of the men.
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Teece
Teece: Yes, and consistantly in our faces
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Squ1d_Lips
Squ1d_Lips: WTF does atheism have to do with science, god-boy? please do tell? Two subjects that can be completely exclusive of one another. You dont need to know anything about science in order to come to the conclusion that religion is absolute, convoluted bullshit.

My atheism isnt based on science, my atheism exists because the theistic claims have not met their burden of proof.

Is your next topic going to be entitled 'Most Atheists Dont Know About Sauna Etiquette' or 'Most Atheists Dont Know How To Play The Mixolydian Scale'

Your retardation has just sunk to a new depth! Son, i am dissapont!
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Samhung
Samhung: Some atheists over the years who have science or Technology associations.

Indeed most atheists have a higher understanding of how the world works in this field than non atheists in general.
This list includes natural scientists. Social scientists are listed her
WeinbergPeter Atkins (1940–): English chemist, Professor of chemistry at Lincoln College, Oxford in England.[1]
Julius Axelrod (1912–2004): American Nobel Prize winning biochemist, noted for his work on the release and reuptake of catecholamine neurotransmitters and major contributions to the understanding of the pineal gland and how it is regulated during the sleep-wake cycle.[2]
Sir Edward Battersby Bailey FRS (1881–1965): British geologist, director of the British Geological Survey.[3]
Sir Patrick Bateson FRS (1938–): English biologist and science writer, Emeritus Professor of ethology at Cambridge University and president of the Zoological Society of London.[4]
William Bateson (1861–1926): British geneticist, a Fellow of St. John's College, Cambridge, where he eventually became Master. He was the first person to use the term genetics to describe the study of heredity and biological inheritance, and the chief populariser of the ideas of Gregor Mendel following their rediscovery.[5]
Patrick Blackett OM, CH, FRS (1897–1974): Nobel Prize winning English experimental physicist known for his work on cloud chambers, cosmic rays, and paleomagnetism.[6]
Susan Blackmore (1951–): English psychologist and memeticist, best known for her book The Meme Machine.[7]
Sir Hermann Bondi KCB, FRS (1919–2005): Anglo-Austrian mathematician and cosmologist, best known for co-developing the steady-state theory of the universe and important contributions to the theory of general relativity.[8][9]
Paul D. Boyer (1918–): American biochemist and Nobel Laureate in Chemistry in 1997.[10]
Calvin Bridges (1889–1938): American geneticist, known especially for his work on fruit fly genetics.[11]
Sheldon Brown (1944–2008): Bicycle mechanic and technical authority on almost every aspect of bicycles.[12]
Ruth Mack Brunswick (1897–1946): American psychologist, a close confidant of and collaborator with Sigmund Freud.[13]
Sean M. Carroll (1966–): American cosmologist specializing in dark energy and general relativity.[14]
Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar (1910–1995): Indian American astrophysicist known for his theoretical work on the structure and evolution of stars. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1983.[15]
William Kingdon Clifford FRS (1845–1879): English mathematician and philosopher, co-introducer of geometric algebra, the first to suggest that gravitation might be a manifestation of an underlying geometry, and coiner of the expression "mind-stuff".[16]
Frank Close OBE (1945–): British particle physicist, Professor of Physics at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of Exeter College, Oxford, known for his lectures and writings making science intelligible to a wider audience, for which he was awarded the Institute of Physics's Kelvin Medal and Prize.[17]
Jerry Coyne (1949–): American professor of biology, known for his books on evolution and commentary on the intelligent design debate.[18]
Francis Crick (1916–2004): English molecular biologist, physicist, and neuroscientist; noted for being one of the co-discoverers of the structure of the DNA molecule in 1953. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1962.[19][20][21][22][23][24][25]
Sir Howard Dalton FRS (1944–2008): British microbiologist, Chief Scientific Advisor to the UK's Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs from March 2002 to September 2007.[26]
Richard Dawkins (1941–): British zoologist, biologist, creator of the concepts of the selfish gene and the meme; outspoken atheist and popularizer of science, author of The God Delusion and founder of the Richard Dawkins Foundation for Reason and Science.[27]


And......
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Samhung
Samhung: Arnaud Denjoy (1884–1974): French mathematician, noted for his contributions to harmonic analysis and differential equations.[28]
Paul Dirac (1902–1984): British theoretical physicist, one of the founders of quantum mechanics, predicted the existence of antimatter, and won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1933.[29][30]
Gary Drescher: Computer scientist in the field of artificial intelligence. Since receiving his Ph.d. in computer science from MIT, He has published books on both metaphysical naturalism and artificial intelligence.[31]
Thomas Edison: American inventor[32]
Albert Ellis (1913–2007): American psychologist who in 1955 developed Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy.[33].
Sandra Faber (1944–): American University Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of California, Santa Cruz, also working at the Lick Observatory, who headed the team that discovered 'The Great Attractor.[34]
Leon Festinger (1919–1989): American social psychologist famous for his Theory of Cognitive Dissonance.[35].
Richard Feynman (1918–1988): American theoretical physicist, best known for his work in renormalizing Quantum electrodynamics (QED) and his path integral formulation of quantum mechanics . He won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1965.[36][37]
Sigmund Freud (1856–1939): Father of psychoanalysis.[38]
Erich Fromm (1900–1980): renowned Jewish-German-American social psychologist, psychoanalyst, and humanistic philosopher, associated with the Frankfurt School of critical theory.[39]
Christer Fuglesang (1957–), Swedish astronaut and physicist.[40]
Vitaly Ginzburg (1916–2009): Russian theoretical physicist and astrophysicist who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2003. He was also awarded the Wolf Prize in Physics in 1994/95.[41]
Stephen Jay Gould (1941–2002): American paleontologist, evolutionary biologist, and historian of science, one of the most influential and widely read writers of popular science of his generation.[42]
Susan Greenfield, Baroness Greenfield, CBE (1950–): British scientist, writer and broadcaster, specialising in the physiology of the brain, who has worked to research and bring attention to Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease.[43
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Squ1d_Lips
Squ1d_Lips: wut?
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Samhung
Samhung: disease.[43]
Jonathan Haidt (c.1964–): Associate professor of psychology at the University of Virginia, focusing on the psychological bases of morality across different cultures, and author of The Happiness Hypothesis.[44]
E. T. 'Teddy' Hall (1924–2001): English archaeological scientist, famous for exposing the Piltdown Man fraud and dating the Turin Shroud as a medieval fake.[45]
Sir James Hall (1761–1832): Scottish geologist and chemist, President of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and leading figure in the Scottish Enlightenment.[46]
Beverly Halstead (1933–1991): British paleontologist and populariser of science.[47]
G. H. Hardy (1877–1947): a prominent English mathematician, known for his achievements in number theory and mathematical analysis.[48][49]
Peter Higgs (1929–): British theoretical physicist, recipient of the Dirac Medal and Prize, known for his prediction of the existence of a new particle, the Higgs boson, nicknamed the "God particle".[50]
Lancelot Hogben (1895–1975): English experimental zoologist and medical statistician, now best known for his popularising books on science, mathematics and language.[51]
Nicholas Humphrey (1943–): British psychologist, working on consciousness and belief in the supernatural from a Darwinian perspective, and primatological research into Machiavellian intelligence theory.[52]
Sir Julian Huxley FRS (1887–1975): English evolutionary biologist, a leading figure in the mid-twentieth century evolutionary synthesis, Secretary of the Zoological Society of London (1935–1942), the first Director of UNESCO, and a founding member of the World Wildlife Fund.[53]
Frédéric Joliot-Curie (1900–1958): French physicist and Nobel Laureate in Chemistry in 1935.[54][55]
Steve Jones (1944–): British geneticist, Professor of genetics and head of the biology department at University College London, and television presenter and a prize-winning author on biology, especially evolution; one of the best known contemporary popular writers on evolution.[56][57]
Lawrence Krauss (1954-): Professor of physics at Arizona State University and popularizer of science. Krauss speaks regularly at atheist conferences, like Beyond Belief and Atheist Alliance International.[58]
Harold Kroto (1939–): 1996 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry.[59]
Alfred Kinsey (1894–1956): American biologist, sexologist and professor of entomology and zoology.[60]
Richard Leakey (1944–): Kenyan paleontologist, archaeologist and conservationist.[61]
Sir John Leslie (1766–1832): Scottish mathematician and physicist best remembered for his research into heat; he was the first person to artificially produce
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Samhung
Samhung: I think he gets the point.

His assertion is wrong.

The higher the sciencitic or Technology the social structure or individual has the greater the percentage of Atheists within that sphere
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Squ1d_Lips
Squ1d_Lips: 'And all the for the benefit of the men.'

exactly....i dont like the arrogance that theists believe that the billion universe galaxy was created just for us. I think they are too afraid to come to the realisation that mankind is completely insignificant.
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latitude61
latitude61: hey tops and poker, i agree with you
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davidk14
davidk14: Squid...It's not that humankind is insignificant, it's that humankind is a part of the universe.
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jim-jim!
jim-jim!: science is NOT a religion... jesus
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CandyRivers
CandyRivers: neither is geography or history - or any other o level/gcse (apart from religion lol - I got an A in it)
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Squ1d_Lips
Squ1d_Lips: 'Squid...It's not that humankind is insignificant, it's that humankind is a part of the universe.'

yes, and that part, being insignificant. Not as, religion would have u belive, that the universe revolves around humankind. This simply is not the case and just shows the immaturity and insecurity of religion.
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engi_sony
engi_sony: Sqid_lips..you talk as if you are a final authority when it comes to religion and its insignificance. Have you done any in depth study of all religion and arrived at your conclusions? Or is it merely a display of arrogance and intolerance on your part?
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davidk14
davidk14: *ouch*
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Metaphorguy
Metaphorguy: Well I have a general interest in a lot of science stuff and find Big Bang Theory funny. Although, even if I was a genius I couldn't answer a handful of questions about different subjects. That's why textbooks are good as reference manuals.
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