Odds of other life in the Universe (Page 10)

angpd
angpd: kitty I would think any giant star due to their short life span, speculation
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kittybobo34
kittybobo34: Giant stars are generally the blue ones, but your right, a red giant would have burned its planets away.
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kittybobo34
kittybobo34: A small point for life in space, we have found rock eating bacteria 2 miles down on this planet. So if this planet should explode, it would effectively be blasting life all over the solar system and beyond.
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angpd
angpd: That may be true if you assume this bacteria survived the initial blast of whatever caused the planet to explode. And you assume they could survive in the vacuum of space long enough to reach some friendly environment. Although they may have a food source, are the conditions in space equivalent to those found 2 miles down in the earth?
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Corwin
Corwin: They did experiments on the ISS where they exposed many strains of single-celled life to the hard-radiation and vacuum of space for prolonged periods, and many survived.

This supports the hypothesis that microbial life may have evolved to withstand those conditions, and early life on Earth may possibly have been blasted into space several times during the Early Bombardment Period of the planet's formation (essentially sterilizing the planet each time), but then reseeded itself once the debris fell back to Earth.

This also lends support to "Panspermia Theory", that once life takes hold on one planet in a galaxy, it will inevitably "infect" the rest of the galaxy wherever the conditions are possible (given enough time). Which also suggests that life on Earth may have originated elsewhere in the galaxy.

It's a bit of a stretch, but entirely possible.
(Edited by Corwin)
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kittybobo34
kittybobo34: I am coming around to that idea myself, especially given the rock eating bacterial life found 2 miles down, and the sulfur eating bacteria at the boiling vents at the bottom of the ocean.
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kittybobo34
kittybobo34: These bacteria have the ability to encyst themselves and wait for 1000's of years for the right conditions.
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Corwin
Corwin: Possibly millions of years, or hundreds of millions.

Think of the probability of their survival frozen in a space-rock like the decay of an isotope (like a half-life)... if there's enough of them, it's almost a certainty that a few will survive eons, and it only takes a single one to make it to a safe harbor.
(Edited by Corwin)
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kittybobo34
kittybobo34: And that is just bacteria, virus can survive even longer.
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angpd
angpd: Ok, that solves the survival in space part. Now how about the heat? Whatever caused initial blast that made the planet explode in the first place must have created a lot of heat. Also the heat of reentry into that other friendly environment.
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angpd
angpd: Is it likely your bacteria or viruses would survive that?
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Corwin
Corwin: About viruses... the point is moot. A virus is not a true life-form, but rather a parasitic strand of RNA that can only replicate via inserting itself into a living host cell. It neither feeds, nor excretes, and cannot survive nor reproduce on its own.

As far as the heat of the initial impact blast and later re-entry, these events happen so rapidly that it's often only the outer shell of the object that becomes seared, leaving the interior undamaged and unheated.
For example, take an ice-cube and hold a blow torch to it... after several seconds very little of the ice-cube will have sublimed and you could still cool your drink with it.
Also why you can find meteorites on the ground... the exterior "ablates" on the outside under the thousands of degrees of re-entry, but that lasts only seconds before it reaches the ground, and whatever remains is undamaged.

The same way astronauts can survive the heat of re-entry when their capsules come screaming through the atmosphere, which is pretty much just a man-made meteor with comfy chairs inside.
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kittybobo34
kittybobo34: Agreed about RNA, but early bacteriums have the components of two symbiotic virus in them. Often wondered if this was part of the beginning.
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Angry Beaver
Angry Beaver: Wasn't god considerate making things hundreds of thousands of years ago so jesus could catch a fish
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calybonos
calybonos: And on the seventh day God ended His work which He had done, and He rested on the seventh day from all His work which He had done.

...until he realized he had forgotten the tartar sauce.
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Angry Beaver
Angry Beaver: DOH!
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GothGye
GothGye: Apart from a few people ( like maybe 20?) and animals , I can't even see evidence of intelligent life on this planet , let alone anywhere else lol I'm sure intelligence exists out there somewhere in some places every now and then. It is possible lol I want to believe
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angpd
angpd: i think the key is when not if. at some point in time, before or in the future i think it is highly possible. i think intelligence is a fleeting thing. not destined for a long life.
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GothGye
GothGye: But the pyramid's have had a pretty long life , they weren't that dumb lol
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angpd
angpd: well, compared to the dinosaurs, not very long. can't imagine us sticking around as long as they did. I think life favors the less intelligent.
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kittybobo34
kittybobo34: Life favors the adaptable. But you are right, the dinosaurs last hundreds of millions of years, and some are still around (birds)
I am hoping our intelligence will enable us to take control of our own evolution. First eliminating genetic diseases, then fixing errors in our design. Ether we do that or our machines will replace us..
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GothGye
GothGye: well I think that the spirit world contains the highest forms of intelligence , and if you are someone that believes in spirituality ( the supernatural, the paranormal ,intuition etc..) then it's usually agreed upon that it's the oldest of all things ever. But someone that doesn't believe in spirituality obviously wouldn't agree with this. But it's just what I believe . I respect what people believe unless it is something harmful to others
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Blackshoes
(Post deleted by Blackshoes 3 years ago)
MrNoone 0
MrNoone 0: nice
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kittybobo34
kittybobo34: Really hoping that Europa mission goes. I think this is the best chance of finding the kind of life that started our planet. Sulfur eating anaerobic bacteria. This kind of life is based on chemistry rather than the sun, so it can occur anywhere there is water and vulcanism.
(Edited by kittybobo34)
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