The Robots are coming (Page 101)

ghostgeek
ghostgeek: Amazon has been testing stores—even grocery stores!—with automated shopping. They’re called Amazon Go. The idea is that sensors will know what you’ve picked up. You can simply walk out with purchases that will be charged to your account, without any human contact.

[ https://getpocket.com/explore/item/eliminating-the-human?utm_source=pocket-newtab-global-en-GB ]
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ghostgeek
ghostgeek: AI: AI is often ( though not always ) better at decision-making than humans. In some areas, we might expect this. For example, AI will suggest the fastest route on a map, accounting for traffic and distance, while we as humans would be prone to taking our tried-and-true route. But some less-expected areas where AI is better than humans are also opening up. It is getting better at spotting melanomas than many doctors, for example. Much routine legal work will soon be done by computer programs, and financial assessments are now being done by machines.

[ https://getpocket.com/explore/item/eliminating-the-human?utm_source=pocket-newtab-global-en-GB ]
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ghostgeek
ghostgeek: Robot workforce: Factories increasingly have fewer and fewer human workers, which means no personalities to deal with, no agitating for overtime, and no illnesses. Using robots avoids an employer’s need to think about worker’s comp, health care, Social Security, Medicare taxes, and unemployment benefits.

[ https://getpocket.com/explore/item/eliminating-the-human?utm_source=pocket-newtab-global-en-GB ]
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ghostgeek
ghostgeek: Personal assistants: With improved speech recognition, one can increasingly talk to a machine like Google Home or Amazon Echo rather than a person. Amusing stories abound as the bugs get worked out. A child says, “Alexa, I want a dollhouse” … and lo and behold, the parents find one in their cart.

[ https://getpocket.com/explore/item/eliminating-the-human?utm_source=pocket-newtab-global-en-GB ]
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ghostgeek
ghostgeek: Big data: Improvements and innovations in crunching massive amounts of data mean that patterns can be recognized in our behavior where they weren’t seen previously. Data seems objective, so we tend to trust it, and we may very well come to trust the gleanings from data crunching more than we do ourselves and our human colleagues and friends.

[ https://getpocket.com/explore/item/eliminating-the-human?utm_source=pocket-newtab-global-en-GB ]
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ghostgeek
ghostgeek: Video games (and virtual reality): Yes, some online games are interactive. But most are played in a room by one person jacked into the game. The interaction is virtual.

[ https://getpocket.com/explore/item/eliminating-the-human?utm_source=pocket-newtab-global-en-GB ]
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ghostgeek
ghostgeek: Automated high-speed stock buying and selling: A machine crunching huge amounts of data can spot trends and patterns quickly and act on them faster than a person can.

[ https://getpocket.com/explore/item/eliminating-the-human?utm_source=pocket-newtab-global-en-GB ]
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ghostgeek
ghostgeek: MOOCS: Online education with no direct teacher interaction.

[ https://getpocket.com/explore/item/eliminating-the-human?utm_source=pocket-newtab-global-en-GB ]
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ghostgeek
ghostgeek: “Social” media: This is social interaction that isn’t really social. While Facebook and others frequently claim to offer connection, and do offer the appearance of it, the fact is a lot of social media is a simulation of real connection.

[ https://getpocket.com/explore/item/eliminating-the-human?utm_source=pocket-newtab-global-en-GB ]
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kittybobo34
kittybobo34: Ghost,, I would agree, it is a simulation.
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chronology
chronology: Don't know ghost Old Fruit, think you are being a Debbie Downer. Put it this way, unless you have the good fortune of being a member of the 'in' crowd at some posh university, you are highly unlikely to enjoy interacting with the people around you. And as you go down the social layers it becomes more and more unpleasant to even be near the people you meet.
This is what people say, they just can't stomach the people they are forced to interact with.
On the other hand folks in the high end of society enjoy their social lives every day.
So the curious mix of anonymity and interactive exchanges social media at least provide a kind of social mixing.

Simple question ghost, would you meet anyone here on wire who you exchange posts with? I very much doubt it. If there was a wireclub get together in New York City, or Las Vegas, I doubt if you, me or anyone else would even consider going. The younger folks here would. They have not got to know people yet.
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ghostgeek
ghostgeek: First they'd have to send me an airline ticket, then I'd have to check my passport was still valid and third I'd have to figure out how to keep my plants watered. Yes, adding it all up, it would be a lot of effort to go talk to Blackshoes.
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ghostgeek
ghostgeek: If I want to send myself to sleep, there are easier ways to do it than listening to him drone on about evolution.
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ghostgeek
ghostgeek: The trouble with being in a simulation is you don't know how deep it goes. You could be in a simulation that was in a simulation that was in a simulation. Brings to mind the film: "The Thirteenth Floor".
(Edited by ghostgeek)
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chronology
chronology: I see you're point entirely Ghost Old Sport.
But talking to a Bot is not quite the same. On the Web people are out blogging endlessly trying to catch the interrst of Americans. The reason is Americans have votes, what they think and feel about a subject matters to politicians. You can talk to a million Bots, but it means nothing. While a number of Americans you convert to your point of view does count, especialy at election time.

so simulated reality, while entertaining, to people who are out to push some kind of politics, is less then pointless.

Even the deranged bloggers here on wire would not want Bots to talk to. They seem to crave the attention of people as they rage against Israel or America.

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ghostgeek
ghostgeek: Maybe the time to get worried is when the bots want to talk to you, in fact insist on talking to you. Turn everything off and they'll still find a way to rear their ugly heads and start pestering you.
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ghostgeek
ghostgeek: Moore’s Law amounts to a halving of the underlying cost of computation every couple of years. It means that every ten years, the cost of the processing that can be done by a computer will decline by a factor of 100. But the implications of this process stretch far beyond our personal laptop use. In general, if an organisation needs to do something that uses computation, and that task is too expensive today, it probably won’t be too expensive in a couple of years. For companies, this realisation has deep significance. Organisations that understood this deflation, and planned for it, became well-positioned to take advantage of the Exponential Age.

If Amazon’s early recognition of this trend helped transform it into one of the most valuable companies in history, it was not alone. Many of the new digital giants, from Uber to Alibaba, Spotify to TikTok, took a similar path. Companies that didn't adapt to exponential technology shifts, like much of the newspaper publishing industry, didn't stand a chance.

[ https://www.wired.co.uk/article/exponential-age-azeem-azhar?utm_source=pocket-newtab-global-en-GB ]
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ghostgeek
ghostgeek: Consider the economy. When an exponential age company is able to grow to an unprecedented scale and establish huge market power, it may fundamentally undermine the dynamism of a market. Yet industrial age rules of monopoly may not recognise this behaviour as damaging. This is the exponential gap.

Or take the nature of work. When new technologies allow firms and workers to offer and bid on short-term tasks through gig-working platforms, it creates a vibrant market for small jobs, but potentially at the cost of more secure, dependable employment. When workers compete for work on task-sharing platforms, by bidding via mobile apps, what is their employment status? What rights do they have? Does this process empower them or dehumanize them? Nobody is quite sure: our approach to work was developed in the nineteenth and twentieth century. What can it tell us about semi-automated gig work? This is the exponential gap.

Or look at the relationship between markets and citizens. As companies develop new services using breakthrough technologies, ever more aspects of our lives will become mediated by private companies. What we once considered to be private to us will increasingly be bought and sold by an Exponential Age company. This creates a dissonance: the systems we have in place to safeguard our privacy are suddenly inadequate; we struggle to come up with a new, more apt set of regulations. This is the exponential gap.

[ https://www.wired.co.uk/article/exponential-age-azeem-azhar?utm_source=pocket-newtab-global-en-GB ]
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ghostgeek
ghostgeek: Anyway, something more humdrum to mull over:

One of the U.S. Defense Department’s two prototype robot warships just fired its first missile.

The military on Friday hailed the test-launch of an SM-6 missile from the Unmanned Surface Vessel Ranger, sailing off the California coast, as “game-changing.”

It’s one thing for an unmanned vessel to launch a missile, however. It’s quite another for the same vessel autonomously to find and fix targets.

The real “game-changer” will come when Ranger or another USV plugs into a wide-ranging command-and-control and data network—one that works in the stress of battle.

The Navy for years has been signalling its intention to supplement, if not partially replace, its traditional manned warships with large numbers of inexpensive USVs.

A tentative fleet plan that the administration of President Joe Biden released in June proposes to add between 77 and 140 unmanned ships and submarines to a long-term force of between 321 and 372 manned vessels.

To that end, the Pentagon’s Strategic Capabilities Office has acquired the two prototype USVs and is planning on buying two more before handing the program over to the U.S. Navy in 2022.

[ https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidaxe/2021/09/08/the-pentagons-robot-warships-just-fired-their-first-missiles/?sh=5d5677ec3c78 ]
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zeffur
zeffur: Within 6 months hackers will have seized control of the vessels & be blackmailing the US & countries within attack range of the vessels if such countries do not pay their blackmail demands...
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chronology
chronology: Zef, don't know if you are joking. But the Navy Drones are as safe as any device can be made. As far as hackers go it would be impossible.

Unless the Navy gets another John Walker. And even another Spy like Walker could not over ride the multiple launch programs.

Mr Walker certainly was a strange man. The United States Navy still considers him their worst traitor ever. But at least he never hated America. He just loved money.
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zeffur
zeffur: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran–U.S._RQ-170_incident

Whether they hack it, jam it, or shoot it down, they have already captured US drones...
Which tells me it is possible to capture an automated sea vessel....
(Edited by zeffur)
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chronology
chronology: Again zef it does seem unlikely. What the Iranians did was the equivalent of throwing a rock at a armed ambulance and by by a fluke hitting a thread pin or some thing.

The Drone they brought down was most likely confused by a storm of signals which temporarily halted it's GPS. The equivalent of them shooting an arrow into a B1 bomber turbine as it flew low or something. A completely 1 in a million situation.

It must have cost iran more to research the American navigation system. Not to mention the years of analysing the little robots signals as it flew past.

Once in a lifetime get lucky event zef. Have they ever done it before or since? The folks in the Pentagon have probably invested in endless cups of coffee and twinkies and a lot of late night work to remove the loophole.
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zeffur
zeffur: I'm less concerned with the Iranians than I am with real hackers, tbh.
The Russians & people who live in the Balkan area are especially proficient at hacking computer systems.

re: "Once in a lifetime get lucky event zef. Have they ever done it before or since? The folks in the Pentagon have probably invested in endless cups of coffee and twinkies and a lot of late night work to remove the loophole."

They did get there hands on another drone (a much better one), but the US govt claims that one malfunctioned & crashed, I believe. It's been a while since I read about it, but it shouldn't be too hard to find if you do a bit of research.
(Edited by zeffur)
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